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Movie Financier Hedge Fund Files for Chapter 11 Over Increasing Litigation Costs

by Justin A. Saporito, Law Clerk

Aramid Entertainment Fund, Limited filed for Chapter 11 protection in the Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York on June 13, 2014.  Debtor has declared assets of $237.3 million and consolidated debt of $11.5 million.  Debtor was assigned case number 1:14-bk-11802, a judge has yet to be assigned.  Approximately 96 creditors were listed in the petition; among them are several other Aramid entities including Aramid Liquidating Trust, Ltd. and Aramid Entertainment, Inc. which jointly filed with the Debtor and were assigned consecutive case numbers.

aramid-logo-618x400                    Aramid Entertainment Fund, Limited is part of Aramid Capital Partners, LLP, a London based hedge fund that specializes in financing movies.  According to their website, Aramid Capital has provided financing for thirty-two (32) movies including Paranormal Activity, W., and How to Lose Friends & Alienate People.  Please click here for a list of their productions.

                   Debtor filed for Chapter 11 protection due to the cost of ongoing litigation against several of its borrowers who failed to repay loans or violated film-financing agreements.  One such suit began in February 2012 and is over an alleged $44 million in losses.  Debtor invested $22 million in a financing deal between Relativity Media, LLC and Sony Pictures.  Debtor alleges that executives from Fortress Investment Group, LLC used Aramid’s confidential information, which was allegedly obtained during a 2010 portfolio review as part of a proposed purchase of Debtor’s assets, to make a deal with Sony that destroyed Debtor’s investments.

                     Debtor and its affiliates are represented by James C. McCarroll, a partner at Reed Smith, LLP who specializes in Financial Industry, Commercial Restructuring, and Bankruptcy.

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NJ Janitorial Firm Bradford and Byrd Tries to Clean House with a Chapter 11

By: Justin A. Saporito, Law Clerk

Bradford & Byrd Associates, Inc. filed for voluntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Jersey on May 23rd, 2014.  The case has been assigned to the Honorable Christine M. Gravelle under case number 3:14:bk-20478.

b&bmopper400Debtor claims assets of less than $50,000 with liabilities ranging between $500,000 and $1 million.  Among debtor’s 21 creditors are the Internal Revenue Service, New Jersey Department of Labor, New York State Workers Compensation Board, Mercedes Benz, and several other companies and private individuals.  Debtor is represented by Bunce Atkinson of Atkinson & DeBartolo, PC from Red Bank, New Jersey.

Debtor is a janitorial firm that was founded in 1989 and headquartered in Freehold, New Jersey.  Debtor provides janitorial services clients in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.  Some of debtor’s more notable clients include UPS, the Social Security Administration Headquarters, and Public Service Electric and Gas Company.  In debtor’s more than 20 years in business, it has achieved some noticeable accomplishments including servicing the Statue of Liberty in 1996 and being contracted to clean vintage chandeliers at West Point Military Academy in 2001.

Quiznos Turns to Bankruptcy Amidst Increased Competition

quiznosBy: Stephen Krug, Law Clerk

The various entities that comprise the Quiznos sandwich chain (“debtors”) filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware on March 14, 2014.   A motion filed by debtors for joint administration of the cases was granted on March 17, and the case has been assigned to the Honorable Peter J. Walsh.

While debtors’ liabilities range from $500 million to $1 billion, the assets are only estimated to fall between $0 and $50,000.  However, Debtors maintain that, although assets are low and 10,001 to 25,000 creditors exist, funds will be available for distribution to unsecured creditors. U.S. Bank National Association, as administrative agent and collateral agent under debtors’ second lien financing facility, is the largest unsecured claimant with a claim for approximately $174 million.  Horizon Media Inc., MG-1005, LLC, and ESPN Inc. also hold substantial unsecured claims.

Debtors have proposed a pre-packaged reorganization plan that would slash debt by more than $400 million and would permit the handful of company-owned sandwich shops to remain operational.  Sandwich stores operated by franchisees are not part of the bankruptcy proceedings and thus are not provided for in the pre-packaged plan.

Debtors hope to emerge from bankruptcy more viable than ever. Moving forward, debtors hope to reduce food costs and place more of an emphasis on advertising.

Debtors are represented by Mark D. Collins of Richards, Layton & Finger, P.A. 

Freedom Industries, Inc. Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Following Historic WV Chemical Spill

By: Justin A. SaporitoMAZURKRAEMER Law Clerk

The following case is of particular interest to Salene since she is  originally from Weirton, West Virginia and attended West Virginia University.

freedom_industries

Freedom Industries, Inc. filed a voluntary petition for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on January 17, 2014 in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of West Virginia.  The case has been assigned to the Honorable Ronald G. Pearson.  Both assets and liabilities are estimated to be between $1 and $10 million.  Approximately 700 creditors are listed in the petition including multiple WV state agencies, service companies, and private individuals.  Multiple motions were filed along with the petition including motions to allow payments to essential trade vendors and to pay $2.4 million in unpaid taxes to the IRS.  A summary of debtor’s filings can be found here.

Debtor is a specialty chemicals manufacturer founded in 1986 and located in Charleston, WV.  It manufactures chemicals for the mining, steel, and cement industries and is wholly-owned by Chemstream Holdings, Inc.  The Charleston chemical plant is located along the Elk River and has recently been widely publicized as the cause of a chemical spill that contaminated the Elk River on January 9th, 2014 which led to state and federal states of emergency being declared.  The spill left 300,000 residents without running water for several days.  The chemical that leaked into the river is used in coal processing.  The local water supply is currently said to be safe for residents in the nine affected counties except for residents in certain towns.  Additionally, pregnant women in the affected areas are advised to drink only bottled water at this time.

Debtor is represented by Mark E. Freedlander of McGuire Woods LLP and Stephen L. Thompson from Barth & Thompson.  Debtor also filed a motion to Employ Pietragallo, Gordon, Alfano, Bosick, and Raspanti, LLP as Special Litigation Counsel.  

DragonFire, Inc. Running Out of Breath as it Files Chapter 11

By: Justin A. Saporito, MAZURKRAEMER Law Clerk

DragonFire, Inc. filed a voluntary petition for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in October 25th, 2013.  The petition was filed in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania and has been assigned case number 2:13-bk-24517.  Debtor’s Disclosure Statement, Balance Sheet, Declaration of Schedules, and other documents were due by November 8th, 2013.  For a complete list of the documents due please refer to the document summary.1366998187

Debtor is the corporate entity for DragonFire Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar located at 1500 Washington Rd. in the Gallery Mall in Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania.  As the name suggests, DragonFire specializes in hibachi and sushi.  For those unfamiliar with hibachi, it is a rectangular Japanese style barbecue grill.  Customers often sit at a counter that spans three sides of the grill.  The chef stands at the fourth side and prepares the meal (which typically consists of fried rice, vegetables, and various meats) with much fanfare.   DragonFire also boasts a robata grill, a traditional Japanese slow grilling method. For more information about DragonFire, you can visit their website here.

Debtor has declared between $50k and $100k in assets with between $500k and $1 million in liabilities with approximately 20 creditors listed in the petition.  Debtor is represented by Donald R. Calaiaro of Calaiaro  & Corbett, P.C.

Fairmont General Hospital of Fairmont, WV Files for Chapter 11 Protection

By:  Justin A. Saporito, MAZURKRAEMER Law Clerk

On September 3, 2013 Fairmont General Hospital, Inc. of Fairmont, WV and affiliate company Fairmont Physicians, Inc. (“debtors”) filed voluntary petitions for bankruptcy relief under Chapter 11 of the bankruptcy code with Fairmont General Hospital, Inc. as the lead debtor.  The petitions were filed with the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of West Virginia with the assigned case numbers 1:13-bk-01054 and 1:13-bk-01055 respectively.  The cases were assigned to the Honorable Judge Patrick M. Flatley (who is originally from Salene’s hometown of Weirton by the way) and consolidated (by debtors’ request) under case number 1:13-bk-01054.

fghThe Debtors’ Chapter 11 Plan and Disclosure Statement are due by January 2, 2014.  Schedules A-J were originally due on September 17, 2013 as were a Statement of Financial Affairs, Statement of Operations, Federal Income Tax Return, and other filings.  (Please see the docket summary for a complete list of due filings.)  At the time of filing, the debtors made multiple motions including motions to extend the time before the required Schedules and other would become due, maintain existing financial institutions and practices, pay pre-filing debts and obligations, and maintain utility services.  All of these motions were granted.  For a complete breakdown of the case please refer to the docket summary.  The Meeting of Creditors has been set for Thursday, October 31, 2013 at 10:00 AM.

Fairmont General Hospital (FGH) is a private, non-profit, community hospital that was originally founded in 1939.  FGH offers a variety of health services including surgical, rehabilitation, mental health, wellness/testing, emergency services, and more.   For a complete list of the services they offer please click here.

The debtors claim assets and liabilities between $10 and $50 million.  Notably, the debtors are currently seeking a strategic partner to take over its facility.  The debtors are represented by Rayford K. Adams, III of Spilman, Thomas, & Battle, PLLC.   Spilman, Thomas, & Battle, PLLC has seven offices spread across West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina with three of their offices located in West Virginia.

New Jersey Residential Developer Hovbilt, Inc. Seeks Chapter 11 Relief

By:  Justin A. Saporito, MAZURKRAEMER Law Clerk and Salene Mazur Kraemer, Owner

bank. court of nj seal                Hovbilt, Inc. filed a voluntary petition for bankruptcy relief under Chapter 11 of the bankruptcy code on September 17th, 2013.  The case was filed in the Bankruptcy Court of New Jersey and the case was assigned to the Honorable Judge Michael B. Kaplan under case number 3:13-bk-30341.  For a summary of the docket please click here.

Debtor claims assets between $0 and $50,000 with liabilities of $1 to $10 million.  In its petition, it lists 10 creditors including Home Depot and Sovereign Bank.  (Please see the docket summary for a complete list of creditors.)  Sovereign Bank filed for a Notice of Appearance and Request for Service of Notice by its duly appointed counsel in response to Debtor’s voluntary petition for Chapter 11 relief.  The petition, as filed, was incomplete and the Attorney Disclosure Statement, Statement of Financial Affairs, Summary of Schedules, and Incomplete Filings are due by October 1st, 2013.

This Chapter 11 Debtor’s exclusive right to file a plan of reorganization expires on January 15, 2014.

CHAPTER 11 DEBTOR TIP: Every Chapter 11 Debtor should know that upon the commencement of a chapter 11 case, Bankruptcy Code section 1121 gives a debtor-in-possession (“DIP”) the exclusive right to file a plan of reorganization for 120 days (4 months).  The DIP also has the exclusive right to solicit acceptances (votes) for a plan filed within that 120-day period until 180 days (6 months) after filing for chapter 11.  (A debtor may file a plan but creditors may not actually vote on the plan until an accompanying approved Disclosure Statement and set of ballots are served).  No competing plans may be filed during this period of exclusivity.  A creditor, a creditors’ committee, or another special interest committee may be one of the parties filing a competing plan.   Sometimes various parties join together to file a “jointly proposed” competing plan.  See helpful article regarding exclusivity written by Salene’ brother-in-law’s fine law firm Jones Day.

This Debtor is a property developer specializing in residential housing developments located at 1 Dag Hammarskjold Blvd. Freehold, NJ 07728.  Hovilt, Inc. was established in 1969 as a private company categorized as a speculative building of single-family houses and primarily operated in Monmouth and Ocean Counties in New Jersey. (source)

Debtor is represented by James G. Aaron of Ansell Grimm and Aaron PC located at 1500 Lawrence Avenue CN 7807 Ocean, NJ 07712.

Riverview Country Club Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in West Virginia

By:  Justin Saporito, MAZURKRAEMER Law Clerk

Riverview Country Club - Flag              On September 10, 2013, the Riverview Country Club, Inc. filed a Chapter 11 Voluntary Petition in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of West Virginia, Case No 2:13-bk-20467 in front of the Honorable Judge Ron Pearson.   Riverview Country Club is a semi-private 18 hole regulation golf course that was built in 1970 and opened in 1972.  Riverview Country Club is located on Route 17 Riverview Course Road in Madison, West Virginia 25130.  The 6,069 yard par 70 course was designed by Bob Plant and is open year round to the public.

The Debtor claims assets valued between 0$ to $50,000 with liabilities of $500,001 to $1 million listing BB&T, Dollar Bank Leasing Corp, Motive Power, Inc. Premier Bank, and USX Transportation as creditors.  The Debtor is represented by Mitchell Lee Klein of Klein Law Office located at 3566 Teays Valley Road Hurricane, WV 25526.  Mr. Klein filed a Corporate Statement Ownership Statement and Corporate Resolution.

Prithvi Catalytic, Inc., an IT Consulting and Engineering Firm, Files Ch. 11 in Pittsburgh

prithvi_logo_10By:  Justin Saporito, Law Clerk

On September 10th, 2013 Prithvi Catalytic, Inc. filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 in the United States Bankruptcy Court  for the Western District of Pennsylvania, which was incomplete.  Statements A-J, Statement of Operations, Summary of Schedules, and Tax Information are due by September 24th, 2013 and a Chapter 11 Plan is due by January 8th, 2014.  Debtor claimed assets between $1 million to $10 million with liabilities ranging from $10 million to $50 million.

The Debtor is a multi-national IT Consulting and Engineering solutions company that began operations in 1998 with its registered office in Hyderabad, India and opened its first U.S. office near Seattle, WA in 2000.  The Debtor expanded operations with new development centers and sales offices in the U.S., Canada, Brazil, India, South Africa, and the Middle East.  Debtor focuses its strategic business in the healthcare, retail, BFSI (banking, financial services, and insurance), and telecom markets and provides services in Europe in addition to the regions where it maintains offices.

A total of fifty-four creditors are listed on the Debtor’s petition including  the District of Columbia, various Departments from 22 different U.S. states, the federal government, and several private companies.  Click here for  Complete list of Creditors and summary of docket.

Debtor is represented by Louis P. Vitti of Vitti & Vitti & Associates, PC located at 215 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222.  The Office of the United States Trustee Liberty Center  shall be represented by Kathleen Robb located at Suite 970 1001 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222.

Inside the Trenches of a Chapter 11: The Firehose of the First 30 Days

fire-hydrant-flushing    The first 30 days of a Chapter 11 bankruptcy case often are like water spewing violently out of a fire hydrant.  Fast.   Furious.  Urgent.  Many issues being thrown at the Debtor, its employees, and its lawyers at one time.

According to the Pre-Bankruptcy Planning for the Commercial Reorganization: A Brief Guide for the CEO, CFO/COO, General Counsel and Tax Advisor, written by the Reorganization and Restructuring Group of Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, LLP (2nd edition, 2008), a whopping 83 percent of chapter 11 reorganizations that are filed generally “die on the vine” and are never confirmed.

I purchased this Brief Guide at the American Bankruptcy Institute that I attended this past Spring and I thought I would write a few blog posts integrating my experience with the concise content of the book.  As set forth on Appendix A to the Guide, generally certain matters must be addressed within the first 30 days of a case.

  • Petition filed
  • Filing of list of 20 largest creditors
  • Applications for retention of professionals (attorneys, accountants, turnaround professionals, valuation specialists, real estate brokers).  A Debtor cannot pay a professional unless the retention of the firm is first approved by the Judge and the professional files a fee application on the docket, to which parties may review and/or object.
  • Filing of ”first day” motions (seeking authority to pay wages, use pre-petition bank accounts, pay deposits for utilities, use of cash collateral, payment of interim compensation to professionals)
  • Filing of schedules of assets and liabilities and statement of financial affairs.  Getting correct addresses and dollar amounts owed for every single creditor often is a daunting task.  Once the Schedules are filed, a creditor matrix is generated. The Bankruptcy Court and parties in interest use this address list to mail or “serve” important pleadings in the case. If the matrix is enormous, certain limited servicing lists can be authorized by the Court. In mega-cases, servicing agents are employed by the Debtor to handle only this aspect of the case, i.e., proper service.
  • Filing of Corporate Resolution authorizing the Chapter 11 filing
  • Negotiation of debtor in possession financing
  • Hearing on use of cash collateral and adequate protection
  • Negotiation with trade creditors regarding reclamation claims and/or reestablishment of trade terms.

The first few weeks of a case can be exhausting and dramatic.  Often, by the time a petition is filed, a debtor runs out of money and payroll has not been paid (therefore employees are angry and morale is low), bank accounts frozen, the utilities have been shut off, and/or the front doors have been padlocked by a creditor.   Once a case is filed, a creditor may immediately file a motion to dismiss the case.

The filing of the petition and related schedules requires a financial autopsy of a business and all of its related entities. In order to avoid confusion down the road, Debtor’s counsel should try to obtain as much factually accurate information as possible during this time. The process requires persistence, diligence and coordination with the Debtor’s employees, who basically become your co-workers for as long as the case is open, which could be 18 months or longer.

During this critical time, management and key employees must be counseled regarding what to do and not do, now that the actions of the Debtor are under close scrutiny by not only a Judge but also a U.S. Trustee as well as the creditor body. Employees should be clear regarding what transfers may or may not be made without court approval.  Also, at the same time, the U.S. Trustee’s Office dictates that a debtor comply with its financial reporting requirements (hence the required “Monthly Operating Report”), and the filing of insurance and bank account information.  Lack of compliance may lead to a dismissal of the case or a conversion to a Chapter 7.  Often the debtor must close pre-petition bank accounts and open new ones.

Keeping all constituencies informed is an important part of the role of Debtor’s counsel.  Creditors may include key lenders and critical vendors who will want to know what the turnaround strategy is for the company. Once creditors receive the “Notice of Suggestion of Bankruptcy”, they too will be scurrying around to hire bankruptcy lawyers if the size of their claims warrants such an expense.